One day, Sam will move to the beach…

Tag: writing (Page 1 of 3)

Stag and the Ash cover!

It’s been a while since you’ve heard from me, and I’m procrastinating, so I thought I’d come show you what I’m working on.

The lovely and talented Madeline Farlow is doing the covers for The Rowan Harbor Cycle, and here’s her piece for Stag and the Ash, which is slated to be released on Thursday, June 28th:

Mr. Burns tells me that this one is his second favorite after the cover for Blackbird in the Reeds, which I think will always be my favorite, too. What do you think?

Anyway, here’s the (working) burb:

Jesse Hunter is finally trying to be an adult, but still feels like an act. His place on the town council is a sham. He’s rarely called on to do anything. His boyfriend is grieving the loss of his mother, and while everyone seems to think he’s doing a great job caring for Sean, Jesse feels like he’s more of a distraction than a real help.

March is shaping up to be a bad month. First, random chance leads him to the realization that the town’s recent trouble is his fault. Then new werewolves come into town, and it turns out they’re also Jesse’s responsibility. He feels like he may be at his breaking point, and he doesn’t want to drag his friends and loved ones down with him. But how will he handle it alone?

Put down everything that comes into your head and then you’re a writer. But an author is one who can judge his own stuff’s worth, without pity, and destroy most of it.

-Colette

As for literary criticism in general: I have long felt that any reviewer who expresses rage and loathing for a novel or a play or a poem is preposterous. He or she is like a person who has put on full armor and attacked a hot fudge sundae or a banana split.

-Kurt Vonnegut

My books are water; those of the great geniuses is wine. Everybody drinks water.

-Mark Twain

A person is a fool to become a writer. His only compensation is absolute freedom. He has no master except his own soul, and that, I am sure, is why he does it

-Roald Dahl

The reason that fiction is more interesting than any other form of literature, to those who really like to study people, is that in fiction the author can really tell the truth without humiliating himself.

-Eleanor Roosevelt

There is something delicious about writing the first words of a story. You never quite know where they’ll take you.

-Beatrix Potter

There are three rules for writing a novel. Unfortunately, no one knows what they are.

W. Somerset Maugham

Brand New Year, Same Old Sam

Hey, guys!

It seems almost compulsory to write a New Year post, either to recap one’s accomplishments from the year passing, or to talk about goals in the coming year. I figured… who am I to buck the trend?

Last year was a big one for me: I finally got my degree, wrote six novels and published four of them, starting what I firmly believe is going to be the last career I’ll ever have. It’s the only one I ever wanted, after all.

I don’t know how anyone else feels, but I have high hopes for 2018. My first book of the year, Blackbird in the Reeds, is coming out on the 4th of January, and the second in its series is already in edits. I hope to release the entire series this year, as well as a few other projects I’ve been working on, and maybe even one that’s still just a series of related ideas.

2017 was bad in the ways I expected, and incredible in ways I didn’t foresee. I’ve made a few friends I think are in it for the long haul, and a few changes in my life that are going to help me keep writing for years to come. I’ve had successes I didn’t expect, and learned from my failures when they happened. All I can hope is that this year will be even better.

I am going to write so many books this year, you guys. So many books. And it’s going to be the most fun yet.

Blackbird in the Reeds

Here it is, the cover of the first book in my new modern fantasy series. It’s the first of nine planned books, coming in 2018.

Blackbird in the Reeds is scheduled for release on January 4th

Blackbird in the Reeds

Devon Murphy has never believed that there were fairies at the bottom of the garden, but when he’s in an accident on his way to his grandmother’s house and comes face to face with the biggest, baddest, most preternaturally intelligent wolf he’s ever seen, he’s forced to reconsider.

When his grandmother asks him to look into a string of suspicious accidents, he finds a much bigger mystery to unravel. From his childhood best friend to the too-attractive Deputy Wade Hunter, everyone in Rowan Harbor seems to have something to hide. Devon has to get to the bottom of it all before the accidents turn deadly.

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