One day, Sam will move to the beach…

Tag: books

On Book Reviews and Bad Behavior

So there’s been a lot of talk recently about reviewing books, the behavior of authors in relation to reviews, and the like. I was thinking about writing a long post about the reviewer/author relationship, and how we’re essentially co-workers, only reviewers don’t get paid to show up.

But then I was hanging out on Twitter, and Annie from From Top to Bottom Reviews referenced a Santino Hassel post about the subject, and after reading it, I feel I can safely say that he’s got me covered.

Santino’s post about the author/reviewer relationship.

If you’ve ever wondered about how to react to a situation with a reviewer or an author, I think this is pretty much it. I feel totally unnecessary in its presence.

Next up: Strike up the Band

Now that Sins of the Father is live, I’m refocused on what’s next: Strike up the Band, to be released in September.

This is Jake’s story, and it’s kind of close to my heart. First, because Jake is literally the first character who came into being in this universe. Second, because Jake, like me and at the suggestion of the excellent Ami, is asexual.

I spent a lot of time trying to decide what asexual looked like for Jake, since it’s different for all of us, and tried to make the book informative on the subject without reading like a wikipedia entry on the subject of asexuality. It’s a finer line than I would have thought.

I’m still trying to decide whether to include this in the blurb other than as a warning that unlike the previous books in the series, this one will have no sex scenes.

For the curious, here’s the blurb:

Jake McKenna doesn’t want to be here. He doesn’t want to be on tour, he doesn’t want to be playing guitar, and he definitely doesn’t want anything to do with Brian Mulholland. He’s biding his time until the tour is over so that he can walk away from his music career for good.

Brian didn’t ask to be here. Okay, maybe he did. Fine, you know what? He wanted this. He may not like the circumstances that have landed him in his dream job, but he’s not going to let anyone ruin it for him, even if it’s the insanely hot guitarist he’s had a crush on since the first time he saw the band play. He will win over Jake McKenna if it’s the last thing he ever does.

 

Personally, I suspect Brian will manage to win Jake over, despite the hurdles they both have between them and the end of the tour.

Sins of the Father is live!

Book two in the Wilde Love series, Sins of the Father, is now available for sale!

Sins of the Father on Amazon.

There’s a giveaway going on right now as well. It’s strictly for members of the mailing list, so if you want a chance to win a signed copy of Straight from the Heart, sign up for the list and follow the link in your email to get your chance to win!

Next up, Jake’s story, Strike up the Band, will be available in September!

 

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Wilde Love Update

For anyone who’s interested, Wilde Love book two, Sins of the Father, has been sent off for editing. This means that I get to spend the next few weeks doing one of two things: emailing my editor every two minutes to ask what she thinks (Sorry Maddie, I’ll do my best not to!), or hiding in a closet and hoping for the best.

Okay, fine, there are other options. I’ve got plenty to do in my ‘day job’ for the next few weeks, which will keep me occupied. Also, I have three homework assignments left to do before I’m finished with college forever. And then believe me, there will be cheesecake.

Funnily enough, all I want to do is start book three. Strike up the Band, y’all. Jake’s story is coming.

Life’s Too Short For Bad Books

When I was sixteen, I prided myself on finishing every single book I picked up to read. It didn’t matter how bad it was, or how much I hated it, if I started it, I was going to finish it. That melodramatic Victor Hugo epic Les Miserables? Every. Last. Word.

In my twenties, a few started slipping through the cracks. I blame it on schoolbooks. There was no way I was going to read the C++ manual front to back. I might have died of boredom.

My twenties saw me finally abandon some fiction, too. The first I remember was Twilight. I tried, you guys, I really did. I got all the way to the last one. Then there was that whole pedophilia thing, and I just… couldn’t. I ran screaming in the opposite direction and never finished the book. That particular hardcover is the single book in my house that gets no respect whatsoever. Which is to say that we use it as a doorstop.

In my thirties, there have been things like the abusive BDSM series that everyone knows. I think that one was my breaking point.

That was when I realized that when I finished a bad book, I didn’t feel accomplished. I felt annoyed, or ripped-off, or outright angry. And it wasn’t like I didn’t see it coming. I can usually tell in the first few chapters whether a book is going to work for me or not. So why am I wasting my precious reading time on things I hate? So that I can be angry and go leave nasty reviews on the work of authors who spent time and effort on those works I hate? I hope not. That’s not the me I want to be.

tl;dr: I have embraced the DNF. Life’s too short for bad fiction. If I decide at any point that the book is going to get a bad review from me, I’m putting it down.

Books are for people who wish they were somewhere else.

-Mark Twain

If you don’t have time to read, you don’t have the time (or the tools) to write. Simple as that.

-Stephen King

Beyond the Sea by Keira Andrews

I grabbed Beyond the Sea last month for a dollar during a bookbub sale. I realize that there’s been some drama over the blurb lines, “Two straight guys. One desert island.”  Many people seem to see it as bi-erasure, and I understand why that would be a point of contention. Bi erasure is a big problem. Maybe I’m just too asexual to understand the point of view as it relates to this book, but as I read it, the characters both believed they were straight and fell in love with another man. I also didn’t even pay attention to the blurb before reading the book, so I didn’t have a chance to get offended and put it down before reading it.

The main characters are both believable and sympathetic at the beginning, and grow as people throughout the novel, which I’ve always found important in any genre. The story is well done. It covers the tropes you’d expect to find in such a novel, and some you wouldn’t. Some research obviously went into how airplanes work, and I didn’t have a moment of doubt as to the validity of the information. (I don’t know if it’s all right, but it’s well presented enough that I believed and didn’t feel a need to look it up.) Some of the most basic things that often get overlooked in stories like this were addressed – like Troy’s depression when he first starts to believe that they won’t be rescued, and the give and take between an introvert and an extrovert in such a stressful situation.

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